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  • pwrcul
    replied
    On Sunday I got help from a couple people in the Linux user group and chose their proposed solution of backing up my data and doing a fresh install of Neon on the m.2 drive.
    (Replacing is a lot easier.)

    I backed up that new Neon system with Timeshift.
    I plan to back up my data today with BackInTime.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    I will go back to a suggestion by Schwarzer Kater to use Back-in-time as a backup system and see about working on setting it up. If others have
    different back-up solution ideas I would be glad to hear them.

    Meanwhile, my KDE Neon main computer has a workaround way of booting at least--that I do not understand and which may be fragile.


    Continuing the story....
    I had decided to begin with Reinstalling GRUB as in https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Gr...ing#via_ChRoot using the
    Ubuntu 22.04 live USB.

    But instead I used "boot-repair" advanced options to try to get GRUB restored and do it with EFI links.
    First I did sudo fdisk -l to find the drives
    The one I am most interested in is /dev/nvme0n1
    Then I ran sudo blkid that revealed the partitions in it
    sda1
    sda2 vfat EFI System partition
    sda3 ext4 the Linux partition

    So I used many "boot-repair" discussion ideas while invoking the automated "boot-repair" tool.

    It failed, and so I restored the old Clonezilla image of the drive's nvme0n1 and got a warning I might have to do modifications of /etc/fstab.

    As I understand it that means my booting and EFI situations should be non-viable....

    I fiddled some more with shorting the CMOS on the x570 Asus motherboard. When you start up it insists you go to BIOS setup and recommends F5 to
    restore defaults. I did F1. I skipped F5. I believe that the NVram is locked problem still is with me.

    I went through the hurdles to open a chat with Asus but only waited and then a miracle happened, at least I think so....

    I started up the box and booted the 500 GB SATA SSD with Ubuntu 22.04 and then restarted and chose the GRUB option to boot Neon
    on the 1 TB nvme board and it booted and is apparently OK.

    I want to go back to setting up backup protection and doing what I need to do to preserve my revived system.

    I expect I can't directly boot into Neon, but I will find out.

    I am lucky for now. I need to pay credit card bills.
    I will check out Back in Time....

    I am keeping my fingers crossed figuratively....

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    I did remove the video card and removed the battery temporarily. Unfortunately I still got the NVram locked message.

    I screwed a new 500 gb SATA SSD onto the case bottom. It already has Ubuntu 20.04 installed on it. I ran it under "boot-repair"
    and got it fixed (small changes) and no NVram locked message. Longer term I want to put MS windows on it for a dual boot as running
    Windows in a VM was tedious and did not invite confidence in my earlier system.


    I continued reading about restoring EFI and GRUB on the larger SSD that had Neon, and I still do not have a clear vision of how to get it restored, so I am backing up
    the partition of the main SSD (with an image by Clonezilla) before trying to explore boot and EFI information and making the partition EFI and Grub enabled.

    The image was successfully created and is restorable. It included a GPT 1st and 2nd partition tables, and a MBR file was found.

    My next step will be to chroot to the partition(s) from a live USB and attempt to install EFI and Grub. I will take a break first.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied

    Each time boot-repair still complains of the NVram being locked.

    So far I have had no success overcoming the "locked NVram" message from "boot-repair."
    I have shorted the pins for the CMOS memory multiple times. The message from the motherboard then is to
    press F1 to work on the BIOS, and then it recommends pressing F5 to restore defaults. Either way it always
    has the correct date and time even if I never press F5. Obviously not all data is cleared. "boot-repair" said to
    limit items to date and time.

    I got another SSD with Ubuntu on it. It's from a former co-worker who is unfamiliar with "boot-repair" software.
    I plan to swap it and my SSD with my system and see how it fares with "boot-repair." That will be a hassle so I am thinking
    of what else to try as well.

    I don't know if I can learn anything from ASUS as my 3 years of phone support are over. I am thinking of starting a chat when I get back.

    Removing the battery will be a hassle as it is under a double wide video card. I would have to disconnect the cables to the box and get inside.
    I see it as walking "the last mile" to clear the NVram/CMOS so I think it may be at a lower cost than reinstalling, etc.

    I have not tried other ways of reinstalling grub... yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    During the night I read a bunch of things including the ASUS TUF Gaming motherboard manual.
    There is close to a consensus that unlocking the NVram is the same as clearing the CMOS RTC RAM.
    The motherboard manual explains how to do that.

    I found many guides to reinstalling grub and several that address using the efibootmgr, such as
    https://www.linuxbabe.com/command-li...otmgr-examples

    I have a rough idea of what to try. But I realize I am a novice at this....

    I may see if the boot-repair program might help. Or other tools.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    This is the first occasion I have had of running boot-repair.
    I ran boot-repair several times and made a requested change to disable compatibility mode and then to disable secure boot.
    Boot-repair said "Error: NVram is locked (Neon not found in efibootmgr)" and said it could not fix the problem.

    I am not sure what to do about that, but it seems to me that a fix is possible as in
    unlock NVram
    and put a link to Neon in efibootmgr.
    I am not sure how to do that or if that is the actual solution.

    Here is the boot-info report:
    https://paste.ubuntu.com/p/xd2kvQ5cdt/

    The program asked me to forward the report to the creators of boot-repair and I did

    I did a search on "Locked-NVram detected".
    This article suggests what might be tried. https://bobcares.com/blog/ubuntu-boo...vram-detected/
    When I return from errands I will search more.

    I think because my grub setup was created in compatibility mode without working with efibootmgr that in order to use boot-repair
    I will need to have its grub replacement include something with efibootmgr. I hope it is not too late to do that and I am not sure yet
    how I can do that.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    Here are boot-info sections that look most relevant to me from the report of boot-info from boot-repair:
    https://paste.ubuntu.com/p/jxNFYWRQDs/


    => Grub2 (v2.00) is installed in the MBR of /dev/nvme0n1

    Operating System: KDE neon 5.27
    Boot files: /boot/grub/grub.cfg /etc/fstab /etc/default/grub
    /boot/grub/i386-pc/core.img

    ==================== nvme0n1p1/etc/default/grub (filtered) =====================

    GRUB_DEFAULT=0
    GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=hidden
    GRUB_TIMEOUT=0
    GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian`
    GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"
    GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=""


    ================= nvme0n1p1: Location of files loaded by Grub ==================

    GiB - GB File Fragment(s)
    369.993530273 = 397.277528064 boot/grub/grub.cfg 1
    351.958030701 = 377.912057856 boot/grub/i386-pc/core.img 1
    49.925853729 = 53.607477248 boot/vmlinuz 2
    49.925853729 = 53.607477248 boot/vmlinuz-5.15.0-83-generic 2
    351.954097748 = 377.907834880 boot/vmlinuz-5.19.0-46-generic 2
    148.232570648 = 159.163510784 boot/vmlinuz-6.2.0-32-generic 2
    148.232570648 = 159.163510784 boot/vmlinuz.old 2
    224.037193298 = 240.558104576 boot/initrd.img 6
    224.037193298 = 240.558104576 boot/initrd.img-5.15.0-83-generic 6
    430.111572266 = 461.828784128 boot/initrd.img-5.19.0-46-generic 2
    240.095653534 = 257.800744960 boot/initrd.img-6.2.0-32-generic 2


    Suggested repair: __________________________________________________ ____________

    The default repair of the Boot-Repair utility would not act on the boot.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    I forgot to mention that the boot-repair program offered to delete my existing code for booting, with no mention of a replacement.
    I responded "no."

    I now recall years ago writing numbered entry points in a sequence of booting options or doing add-ons inserted into such a list.
    I would expect to find their immediate source in /boot/grub/grub.cfg /etc/fstab /etc/default/grub
    I think such items lead to what is placed on /dev/nvme0n1p1

    I will do some grocery shopping and return.

    I welcome corrections and suggestions including references.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    I continued to work with Ubuntu's take on boot-repair.

    Here is my report of boot-info from boot-repair:
    https://paste.ubuntu.com/p/jxNFYWRQDs/

    It declined to recommend any repairs.
    I could not see what the issue is.

    I am not sure how to include the the report contents as boxed plain text.
    I tried the box with the quote symbol and several other options in the button bar here but they did not work.

    Simple posting removes all formatting.
    What is the secret for putting the report into a useful form here?


    I welcome suggestions.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    I chose boot-repair and have a USB stick with Ubuntu 22.04 LTS as described in https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair
    I ran the commands for yannubuntu/boot-repair but it wanted me to set the computer's hardware to UEFI.
    I will try that when I get back from the bank and other errands.

    Leave a comment:


  • claydoh
    replied
    Originally posted by pwrcul View Post
    The update included a big one and a smaller one.
    Yes, that is correct.

    I should check my SSD for errors. How can I do that? Do I have to get it to boot first?
    You can do this from recovery mode --if you could get there from grub, that is.
    You can use a live USB to do it, using KDE Partition Manager, or gparted


    Removal was by OKing a long list of items to be removed that accompanied the update..
    I vaguely recall seeing a set of prior Linux kernel versions as part of them. But I could be wrong.
    I am not sure what tool was used but all I did was OK the removal..
    Ok, that is fine. *buntu systems keep three kernels by default, so you only removed the excess packages related to the fourth.

    I only have Neon installed at this time.
    So that eliminates that idea

    You might look at boot-repair, though I don't know for sure if it works on neon's grub setup or not.
    You can install this from a live *buntu/neon USB stick, and run it from there.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    Thanks, claydoh, for the advice.

    I update frequently. Perhaps I was late on updating this time? I don't feel like I was late.
    The update included a big one and a smaller one.

    I should check my SSD for errors. How can I do that? Do I have to get it to boot first?

    By the default I mean Neon, the previous OS.

    Removal was by OKing a long list of items to be removed that accompanied the update..
    I vaguely recall seeing a set of prior Linux kernel versions as part of them. But I could be wrong.
    I am not sure what tool was used but all I did was OK the removal..

    I only have Neon installed at this time.
    I am pretty sure it is Neon's grub. The installation that now won't boot is recent, as in late July.

    I will hold off on my previous plans a little while. I have some chores to take care of.

    Leave a comment:


  • claydoh
    replied
    Originally posted by pwrcul View Post
    I ran into a problem with the updates.
    Depending on how long you go between updates, the recent one was just KDE gear and Frameworks stuff -- all application-level, and not system level stuff, let alone anything involving Grub, so the updates themselves may not be the cause of this problem.
    Do make sure you check your drive for errors, to be safe.

    Originally posted by pwrcul View Post
    Selecting the default does not work.
    What is the default supposed to be here?

    Originally posted by pwrcul View Post
    I selected boot Neon GNU/Linux and the menu stayed and nothing happened.
    Similarly selecting Advanced options failed to present a list (I think I may have agreed to discard all previous versions of the kernel).
    Sounds right, if you did. What third party tool did you use to tell it to remove the backup kernels?

    if you have multiple distros installed, are you booting with neon's grub, or a different distro's grub?
    If so, you might try selecting a different boot device via your system's bios boot menu, or change the selection in your bios.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    Here's an update.

    I believe the lowest cost path may be reinstalling a fresh copy of KDE Neon.
    If I had confidence in the process and my ability, I would try to fix the boot issue.

    I may be able to create another partition and bypass my current one that uses 1/2 of the TB SSD with only 1/4 of that partition occupied.

    If anyone recommends otherwise feel free to comment as I would prefer not to lose what I had done in the last weeks.

    I wish I had done a Clonezilla image of my system before risking the update..


    I will revisit prior notes on setting up a backup system. I will see about setting that up along with a fresh Neon install which should be downloaded by now.

    From that prior issue I am still working with a local shop on data recovery, and the technician is still working on it. I turned over the old SSD to the technician.
    (He upgraded the CPU successfully in my tight computer case.)

    I will do some home housecleaning before getting back to work on my system. That will take at least an hour.

    Leave a comment:


  • pwrcul
    replied
    I ran into a problem with the updates.

    After installing the updates booting got me as far as the GRUB menu.
    Selecting the default does not work.
    I selected boot Neon GNU/Linux and the menu stayed and nothing happened.
    Similarly selecting Advanced options failed to present a list (I think I may have agreed to discard all previous versions of the kernel).

    I tried other options using a C and an E but they did not work.

    What do you suggest?

    Leave a comment:

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