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Can't download Kubuntu 22.04 onto my flash drive. Why, what am I doing wrong?

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    [SOLVED] Can't download Kubuntu 22.04 onto my flash drive. Why, what am I doing wrong?

    I've created a 4.1 Gb GPT partition with a btrfs on my flash drive and tried twice now to download the ISO (3.5 Gb) to it. Both times it's failed. Can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

    #2
    What does "failed" mean? Disk full message or something else
    Please Read Me
    Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside. -
    Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, 1711

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      #3
      Have you tried downloading it to your system drive then copying it to the USB?
      Please Read Me
      Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside. -
      Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, 1711

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        #4
        Why are you wanting to use BTRFS on a flash drive? It is quite a bit overkill for this type of media.
        What is failing?
        My guess is, like most all Linux-y file systems, you need to set user permissions.ownership on it, just like an ext4.

        For a flash drive, it usually is better to just use Fat32. None of the permissions etc to faff about with.
        It is much easier than messing around with things on ext4/btrfs/etc, doubly so if you intend to use access that stick on another machine.

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        • oshunluvr
          oshunluvr commented
          Editing a comment
          Exfat works well these days also.

        #5
        Firefox's download feature said it failed. Obviously, it didn't say why if tailed; it just didn't complete the download (it got about 4/5 of the way before failing).
        Yes, I did download the ISO to the hdd, then copied it to the stick. But the stick wouldn't boot. The file browser showed the contents of the stick's partition as just a bunch of folders copied rather than the ISO as such a file. That's why I tried to download the ISO directly to the stick.
        Yes, btrfs probably is overkill, but the whole reason for using it is because of the safety/security features built into it, especially for use with an OS. I don't know what you're talking about re. the permissions attendant to using a Linux OS on a flash drive. What has the file system got to do with the installation of an OS?

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          #6
          If your intent is to create a LiveUSB from the desired .ISO file, "copying" it to the stick isn't how it's done. If the downloaded .ISO is on your PC, you 'can' use the dd command to write the .ISO file to the stick. Or, use one of several GUI applications to burn the .ISO to the stick.
          Using Kubuntu Linux since March 23, 2007
          "It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data." - Sherlock Holme

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            #7
            You said nothing about installing anything. You said nothing about Firefox. "Copying" an ISO to a USB drive isn't the way to make it bootable, if that's actually what you did.

            You should probably start over and explain what you are trying to do, what you did, and why it failed. You might benefit from the "Please Read Me" link in my sig.
            Please Read Me
            Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside. -
            Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, 1711

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              #8
              Sure. I am trying to make a LiveUSB of Kubuntu. I accidentally deleted the Kubuntu ISO from the borrowed stick I'm using on my computer (the stick still is in the computer) and want to put it back in there without taking it out of my computer since I'm actually using it, most or all of which still is in ram.
              When one downloads the ISO from Kubuntu's site, s/he does it with a web browser, so the browser controls the download. That's the feature/utility I spoke of.

              Snowhog, what you described is exactly what I want to do. I'm using Linux Mint 20.04 on a borrowed laptop, so what/which GUI app would I use to burn the ISO to the USB. I do have the ISO on it. That's what I thought I'd done before that didn't work.

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                #9
                So you booted into Kubuntu from a LiveUSB on a borrowed PC, then mistakenly deleted the contents of the stick you booted from. Now you want to 'undo' what you did. To do that, you'll need to download the desired .ISO to the borrowed laptop, then burn the .ISO to the stick. But I don't think you can do that without first logging out of the running OS, rebooting the PC and pulling the USB stick before it reboots, logging in to the borrowed PC, then remounting the stick and burning the downloaded .ISO back to the stick.
                Using Kubuntu Linux since March 23, 2007
                "It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data." - Sherlock Holme

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                  #10
                  Almost, not exactly. I have used a borrowed usb to boot Kubuntu into MY tower computer. That's the usb stick I've accidentally deleted the Kubuntu from. But I also have a borrowed laptop, which I'm writing here on (which has Linux Mint 20.04) and which I've used to download the ISO to, hoping not to mess up anything on my tower.
                  I guess I'll have to do what you've suggested, but that's exactly what I've wanted to avoid because I'll have to take load of notes about all the sites/tabs I have up & other intormation before taking that stick out. So ... to proceed to how properly to "burn" the ISO to the stick, what is the gui utility I do that with, and what's the procedure? I've done it before, but I haven't seen how to do it this time.

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                    #11
                    Originally posted by RLynwood View Post
                    […]
                    .. to proceed to how properly to "burn" the ISO to the stick, what is the gui utility I do that with, and what's the procedure? I've done it before, but I haven't seen how to do it this time.
                    If you use LinuxMint :
                    https://linuxmint-installation-guide...test/burn.html

                    If you use (K)Ubuntu :
                    https://ubuntu.com/tutorials/create-...ntu#1-overview

                    balena Etcher - a simple tool for all operating systems to write ISOs to USB:
                    https://www.balena.io/etcher
                    Last edited by Schwarzer Kater; Jan 23, 2023, 05:59 PM. Reason: typos
                    Desktop: Debian 11 KDE & LXQt • Kubuntu 22.04 & 20.04 • Win10 • Lenovo ThinkCentre M710s
                    Nvidia GT 1030 • Intel i5-7600 • 16 GB RAM • 256 GB Toshiba XG4 M.2 SSD • 1000 GB Crucial MX500 SSD
                    Laptop: Kubuntu 22.04 • macOS X 15 • Apple MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2012)
                    Intel HD 4000 • Intel i7-3520M • 16 GB RAM • 1 TB Kingston KC600 SSD

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                      #12
                      You missed my point. But I've just burned the Kubuntu ISO to my personal usb stick, and it booted properly.
                      Last edited by RLynwood; Jan 24, 2023, 09:10 AM.

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