Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: From Grub II to loading Plasma takes about 2 minutes now

  1. Back To Top    #1
    Kubuntu as a Second Language
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, North America, Planet Earth, Sol System, Orion Spur, Orion Arm, Milky Way
    Posts
    1,200
    Threads
    199
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    10:52 AM

    From Grub II to loading Plasma takes about 2 minutes now

    Yesterday I applied the big update and rebooted. It took a while but I figured that was probably due to redoing some stuff to finish the update. Today I turned on my machine and got the same delay! I wonder if the fact that I am having to use a larger boot sector size for Grub II to boot my newer tech SSD's might be the cause. Maybe some of the commands that the Ubuntu devs use might be too old and aren't working correctly for the newer tech SSD's.
    kubuntu and linux will lead the computing world by 2050A.D.
    If not then Tux will come to your house and currupt all your non-linux installes! :eek:

    http://www.kubuntu.org/getkubuntu

  2. Back To Top    #2
    Ascendant oshunluvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Bern, NC USA
    Posts
    10,660
    Threads
    435
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    12:52 PM
    No, boot sector size is not a delay factor IME. Actually, I'm not sure what you even mean by that. A boot sector is only 512b. period. Try

    systemd-analyze blame

    to see what the delay is. Most likely, excessive mount times or networking.
    Please Read Me
    Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside. - Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, 1711

  3. Back To Top    #3
    Kubuntu Padawan Don B. Cilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ibiza, Spain
    Posts
    1,120
    Threads
    57
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    06:52 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by oshunluvr View Post
    Try
    systemd-analyze blame
    to see what the delay is. Most likely, excessive mount times or networking.
    Or if that doesn't help (much), dmesg -T - or turning off (eliminating) QUIET SPLASH in /etc(default/grub (and re-updating grub) ;·)

  4. Back To Top    #4
    Kubuntu as a Second Language jglen490's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Montgomery AL
    Posts
    1,594
    Threads
    52
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    11:52 AM
    Same update applied here.
    Code:
    john@john-desktop:~/Downloads$ systemd-analyze
    Startup finished in 11.614s (firmware) + 5.530s (loader) + 2.692s (kernel) + 9.797s (userspace) = 29.635s
    graphical.target reached after 9.791s in userspace
    No change. It's something else.
    I feel more like I do now than I did when I got here.
    Home Brew PC: ASRock H110M-HDS R3.0, 120GB+500GB, 16GB RAM
    Kubuntu 18.04.4.LTS Bionic, 5.3.0-53-generic x86_64, Plasma 5.12.9

  5. Back To Top    #5
    Kubuntu as a Second Language
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, North America, Planet Earth, Sol System, Orion Spur, Orion Arm, Milky Way
    Posts
    1,200
    Threads
    199
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    10:52 AM
    I was referring to the fact that the default of 1024 sectors at the beginning of the boot partition is not big enough for Grub II to install and you have to manually change it to 2048 in order to have enough space to install Grub II on these newer tech SSD's.
    kubuntu and linux will lead the computing world by 2050A.D.
    If not then Tux will come to your house and currupt all your non-linux installes! :eek:

    http://www.kubuntu.org/getkubuntu

  6. Back To Top    #6
    Kubuntu as a Second Language
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, North America, Planet Earth, Sol System, Orion Spur, Orion Arm, Milky Way
    Posts
    1,200
    Threads
    199
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    10:52 AM
    Be back later. Watching NASA, Space X demo 2 flight readiness review.
    kubuntu and linux will lead the computing world by 2050A.D.
    If not then Tux will come to your house and currupt all your non-linux installes! :eek:

    http://www.kubuntu.org/getkubuntu

  7. Back To Top    #7
    Kubuntu as a Second Language jglen490's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Montgomery AL
    Posts
    1,594
    Threads
    52
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    11:52 AM
    Essentially, when I went from spinners to SSDs, boot time no longer mattered. Boot went from on the order of minutes, to being measured in seconds. And the current systemd-analyze time is about half what it was on my old MB right before it blew chunks ...

    I have a cheap ASRock MB (not all of them are!), and it's what I wanted for an immediate replacement (from Amazon) of the old MB (died Wednesday, completely back up on Saturday) because it took all my other components. I'm working on the list for my next setup, which will be much better

    And to Steve7233's statement about expanding the "boot partition" from 1024 to 2048. It almost sounds like legacy boot on a GPT partition table. If so, then this would be a perfect candidate for straight up UEFI and an ESP which can be sized to anything.
    I feel more like I do now than I did when I got here.
    Home Brew PC: ASRock H110M-HDS R3.0, 120GB+500GB, 16GB RAM
    Kubuntu 18.04.4.LTS Bionic, 5.3.0-53-generic x86_64, Plasma 5.12.9

  8. Back To Top    #8
    Kubuntu Padawan Don B. Cilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ibiza, Spain
    Posts
    1,120
    Threads
    57
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    06:52 PM
    Yes, my boot times (on a six-year-old mobo, and a barely decent SSD) are fast enough for me.
    I boot back and forth all the time, no problem.

    Personally, I'm just curious about them.

    My last boot:
    Code:
    09:38 not@all:~$ systemd-analyze
    Startup finished in 7.623s (firmware) + 8.880s (loader) + 6.168s (kernel) + 6.833s (userspace) = 29.505s
    graphical.target reached after 6.808s in userspace
    But then I only have
    4.902s systemd-networkd-wait-online.service
    compared to the 12 seconds or so I used to have with NetworkManager-wait-online.service... that probably is a slight advantage :·)

  9. Back To Top    #9
    Kubuntu as a Second Language jglen490's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Montgomery AL
    Posts
    1,594
    Threads
    52
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    11:52 AM
    Slight advantage ...

    But the real question is, "advantage" for what? I was distinctly underwhelmed by the couple of seconds that systemd-analyze indicated that I'd saved from chasing apt-daily.service out of the boot stream. In reality, wall clock time is the only thing that matters, and if it's good ("from on the order of minutes", "to seconds") that's good enough.
    I feel more like I do now than I did when I got here.
    Home Brew PC: ASRock H110M-HDS R3.0, 120GB+500GB, 16GB RAM
    Kubuntu 18.04.4.LTS Bionic, 5.3.0-53-generic x86_64, Plasma 5.12.9

  10. Back To Top    #10
    Ascendant oshunluvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Bern, NC USA
    Posts
    10,660
    Threads
    435
    Local Date
    May 25th 2020
    Local Time
    12:52 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by steve7233 View Post
    I was referring to the fact that the default of 1024 sectors at the beginning of the boot partition is not big enough for Grub II to install and you have to manually change it to 2048 in order to have enough space to install Grub II on these newer tech SSD's.
    OK, gotcha. You've sort of mixed a couple things together. Let me split some hairs for you (lol):

    The "boot sector", actually "Master Boot Record" (MBR) is now and always has been 512 bytes (34 sectors) as you can see here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master...#Sector_layout . The newer and better partitioning scheme, "GUID Partition Table" (GPT) uses the same 512 byte space https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table. Both of these take only 512 bytes and reserve sectors 0 or 1 to 33 (I'm not entirely sure if they start at 0 or 1).

    The reason we start partitions at sector 2048 by default when partitioning has nothing to do with GRUB. It has everything to do with sector and partition alignment and changes to drive geometry, which happens to be rather critical to SSD performance. Starting off-sync with the SSD "borders" causes a real slow-down in read/write - and that's why we bought SSD's right? Platter drives hardly notice the difference, but SSDs really show it. So the default starting sector for all formatting was changed to 2048 because most people don't have the skill or knowledge to adjust that, plus, it's a real pain if you start out wrong and have to reformat. So now when we start our partitions at sector 2048 to align them properly, the sectors between the MBR/GPT and the first partition - sectors 34-2047 - normally go unused - about 1MB. The old default starting sector was 63 for some reason.

    Then there was a change to GRUB that occurred when we went to GRUB2 from Legacy GRUB several years back - before GPT was in common use like it is now. The amount of available space in the 512B boot sector changes when you use GPT formatting instead of MBR formatting. The GPT boot sector isn't big enough to hold all that is needed for the GPT stuff AND GRUB, so we accommodate GRUB with a "BIOS boot partition" - partition type EF02. This is explained particularly well here in the section referencing GRUB 2. When using Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) instead of old-fashioned BIOS, we use an EFI system partition (ESP) instead, partition type EF00. Both of these just to make room for GRUB2 Stage 2.

    If you are using GRUB and GPT but not EFI, you can squeeze the needed EF02 partition into the unused space at sectors 34-2047 by following this guide I wrote. This does not hurt SSD performance because you only read the EF02 partition at boot time.

    Now that I've gotten that off my chest - none of the above would slow down your boot time.
    Please Read Me
    Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside. - Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, 1711

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •