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Can I remove a LiveUSB Kubuntu 22.04 stick from my current session & put another one in and continue the session?

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    [SOLVED] Can I remove a LiveUSB Kubuntu 22.04 stick from my current session & put another one in and continue the session?

    Can I remove a LiveUSB Kubuntu 22.04 stick from my current session without unmounting and it without damaging that stick's Kubuntu, then put another LiveUSB Kubuntu 22.04 stick in and continue the session without losing any of the session's contents/activity, as apps running?

    #2
    No.
    Though removing it should not damage the USB stick. You will almost certainly break the live desktop session.

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      #3
      Just save what you want saved to the PC the stick is plugged in to. Simple. Then you can transfer the saved data to another USB stick that is ready to receive data.
      Using Kubuntu Linux since March 23, 2007
      "It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data." - Sherlock Holmes

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        #4
        Thank you both, especially claydoh. I needed to know that removing the stick would break the desktop session. It's my Firefox data, not other data, I'm interested in. I asked about saving my Firefox data in another post (not having gotten an answer in that other post, trying to follow the reasoning necessary to solving my interdependent problems) and learned that Live Kubuntu does not allow the user to access those data. The Profile folder & subfolders are empty. I'm just going to have to make hand notes.

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          #5
          Originally posted by RLynwood View Post
          Can I remove a LiveUSB Kubuntu 22.04 stick from my current session ... and continue the session without losing any of the session's contents/activity, as apps running?
          Not normally, but if the computer has enough RAM, sometimes it can be made possible to do so, by adding "toram" to the linux command line. You have to get access to the command line used by the boot from the stick by getting a grub menu and pressing "c". I can't remember how to persuade the LiveUSB to give the grub menu.
          Regards, John Little

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            #6
            Hmm. I'm not sure I understand. I'm pretty sure I have enough RAM: 32 Gb, The system Monitor says I'm using 13.8 of 31.2 Gb total. I think it's saying Kubuntu us using about 16.40 ? (doesn't give units). And it lists all other programs up using about 300 Mb of space total. i do have access to the Kubuntu LiveUSB's Konsole. So far, so good. Next I need to know how to do what you say you can't remember. Anyone else?

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              #7
              Originally posted by RLynwood View Post
              32 Gb
              Yes that's lots. I only mentioned "enough RAM" for completeness.
              I do have access to the Kubuntu LiveUSB's Konsole.
              That's too late, so to speak*. "toram" has to be applied when starting the linux kernel. The boot takes longer, as there's an extra step copying to RAM.

              In the past, how to get the text menu with "Try Kubuntu" on it depended on the hardware. I installed Kubuntu once on an Acer and one had to hit a key, one of the space bar or enter, at just the right moment. It was useful for very limited hardware with only one decent USB port. I used to use "toram" a lot for doing an "iso boot" from an iso file in main storage, typically the download folder, and then installing onto that storage; not having to muck about with USB sticks was a huge time saver.

              * This is getting way into the weeds, but in principle it's possible using kexec.
              Regards, John Little

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                #8
                It looks like this is beyond what I'll need. I think I'll just write down all I can from the current session, then end the session and reboot w/ my personally made Kubuntu usb stick, then replace Kubuntu in the erased partition of the borrowed stick.
                My remaining question somewhere above is if it's necessary to put GRUB on a stick partitioned with multiple OSs &/or utilities, as boot Repair disks, in order to use those utilities. I assume so but don't know right off how to do that.

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