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Thread: SWAP size inconsistencies

  1. Back To Top    #11
    Ascendant oshunluvr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pooky2483 View Post
    After what you said, I believe it's safe to leave them, however, I did some digging and found that it's best not to have SWAP on a SSD...
    I disagree. SWAP is only used when your RAM is too full for what you are doing, which is rare unless you have a bare minimum of RAM or are a very heavy process user. Swapping RAM to a device makes access unbearably slow. What's the point of having a nice high-speed SSD if you're not going to take advantage of the speed? Modern (five years old or less) SSDs will last at least as long as any hard drive. So what are you "saving" the SSD for exactly? If you're using swap a lot you'd be much better off with more RAM and an SSD. The people who make these sort of claims are frankly just trying to make themselves sound important by quoting minute technical details and spreading FUD without any regard to actual normal usage. Most of us live in the real world, and in the real world, your computer and it's SSD will likely outlive it's usefulness so what's the point of not using the SSD to it's full extent?

    Regardless, I agree with Don that you have way more swap than you'll ever need. But you are also correct that you're not hurting anything by leaving it alone. The general advice I give on SWAP size is SWAP should match the size of your RAM if you hibernate your computer, at least double if you have a small amount of RAM (4GB or less IMO), and half as much if you don't hibernate and have a lot of RAM (16GB or more). Then tune your swap (your link has some good pointers in that area).

    Some other interesting thoughts on SWAP: If you have two swap partitions you can use them both in RAID0 style by mounting them with matching priority. If one is on SSD and the other on HDD, give the SSD swap higher priority. If you care to keep your TMPFS (temporary files) in RAM instead of on a drive (speeds access for a lot of operations), you can create a TMPFS size as large or even larger than your RAM, and it will use swap as your RAM fills - thus allowing you the best of both worlds - TMPFS in RAM until RAM starts to fill, then TMPFS moves to disk via SWAP to allow processes to use more RAM. I do this last one, but I also have an NVME drive and 16GB RAM along with some SSDs and HDDs. I can afford the space for swap on SSD
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  2. Back To Top    #12
    Kubuntu as a Second Language
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    Quote Originally Posted by oshunluvr View Post
    But you are also correct that you're not hurting anything by leaving it alone.
    If the 16.04 install was hibernated, will using its swap as swap in 18.04 screw it up?
    Regards, John Little

  3. Back To Top    #13
    Emergent AI kubicle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlittle View Post
    If the 16.04 install was hibernated, will using its swap as swap in 18.04 screw it up?
    More than likely.

    And 60Gb is a ridiculous amount of swap (even if storage space is cheap). If you ever need as much, you'll have bigger problems than running out of swap space.

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