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Thread: SWAP size inconsistencies

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    Contributing Member pooky2483's Avatar
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    SWAP size inconsistencies

    I've done a fresh install of Kubuntu 18.04 and noticed something strange.
    The SWAP partition size is showing wrong in Task Manager.
    See screenshots

    GParted shows just over 30Gb
    System Monitor shows double the size...

    Is this a known bug or something?
    Kubuntu 18.04LTS~64bit|Plasma 5.12.9|KDE 5.47.0|QT 5.9.5|Linux 5.3.0.40~generic|M5A78L-M USB3|BIOS 2101|AMD PhenomII X4 965 3400+|P8H77-I Motherboard NIC|8.0GB PC3-10600 1333Mhz CL9 (9-9-9-24)DDR3

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    Emergent AI kubicle's Avatar
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    What is the output of the command:
    Code:
    swapon --show

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    Ascendant oshunluvr's Avatar
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    What's the swap line(s) in your /etc/fstab?

    Could be you have both a swap file and a swap partition.
    Please Read Me
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    Emergent AI kubicle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oshunluvr View Post
    Could be you have both a swap file and a swap partition.
    "swapon --show" should tell us if that's the case

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    Contributing Member pooky2483's Avatar
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    Yep, you win a prize...

    NAME TYPE SIZE USED PRIO
    /dev/sdb5 partition 30.5G 1M -2
    /dev/sda1 partition 30.5G 0B -3
    Last edited by pooky2483; Mar 9th 2020 at 02:54 PM.
    Kubuntu 18.04LTS~64bit|Plasma 5.12.9|KDE 5.47.0|QT 5.9.5|Linux 5.3.0.40~generic|M5A78L-M USB3|BIOS 2101|AMD PhenomII X4 965 3400+|P8H77-I Motherboard NIC|8.0GB PC3-10600 1333Mhz CL9 (9-9-9-24)DDR3

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    Insert Pithy Nothingness here claydoh's Avatar
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    Homepage: Go to claydoh's homepage
    You have two swap partitions, not the default swap file, on two separate hard drives. *buntu will automatically make use of any existing swap partition it finds during booting, say from another OS install. You can get rid of the one on the same drive as Kubuntu (delete and resize another partition), and have both OSs use the same swap partition.

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    Ascendant oshunluvr's Avatar
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    I would check and possibly edit fstab first. AFAIK, the installer finds all your swap partitions at install time and add entries to fstab. You don't want to delete a swap partition before removing it from fstab or you might not be able to boot.

    Also, since we're on this topic - not that it's a big deal - but "swapon" without any options gives the same results as "swapon --show", at least it does on 18.04
    Please Read Me
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    Contributing Member pooky2483's Avatar
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    My fstab

    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
    # device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
    # that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
    #
    # <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>
    # / was on /dev/sda5 during installation
    UUID=a0207414-3a8a-4414-8b6a-3fa373ec8eca / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1
    # swap was on /dev/sda1 during installation
    UUID=8fa66fc7-5e92-466e-b69b-fc47e7aa206e none swap sw 0 0
    # swap was on /dev/sdb5 during installation
    UUID=db4a8f5c-eba4-4ded-a3b9-bdbfc4412beb none swap sw 0 0

    I have Kubuntu 16.04 on another HD
    Kubuntu 18.04LTS~64bit|Plasma 5.12.9|KDE 5.47.0|QT 5.9.5|Linux 5.3.0.40~generic|M5A78L-M USB3|BIOS 2101|AMD PhenomII X4 965 3400+|P8H77-I Motherboard NIC|8.0GB PC3-10600 1333Mhz CL9 (9-9-9-24)DDR3

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    Contributing Member pooky2483's Avatar
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    After what you said, I believe it's safe to leave them, however, I did some digging and found that it's best not to have SWAP on a SSD.
    Read the fist comment to this...
    https://linuxize.com/post/how-to-add...#disqus_thread
    Kubuntu 18.04LTS~64bit|Plasma 5.12.9|KDE 5.47.0|QT 5.9.5|Linux 5.3.0.40~generic|M5A78L-M USB3|BIOS 2101|AMD PhenomII X4 965 3400+|P8H77-I Motherboard NIC|8.0GB PC3-10600 1333Mhz CL9 (9-9-9-24)DDR3

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    Kubuntu Padawan Don B. Cilly's Avatar
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    With 8G RAM, unless you do heavy-duty graphics/video editing, you're hardly ever going to use swap.
    Unless, of course, if you hibernate/sleep etc.
    So I guess you might as well keep it, "just in case".

    If you'd like to know how much RAM you're using - without resorting to ksysguard and such - you could just have a a little conky on screen.
    For real memory usage, I use - among other instructions:
    ${execbar free -m | awk '/Mem:/ { printf ( $2-$7 ) /$2*100 }'}

    [EDIT] If you'd like to see my conky, and what the other instructions are, it's here.
    Last edited by Don B. Cilly; Mar 9th 2020 at 09:11 PM.

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