Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Automatically delete cached update packages

  1. Back To Top    #1
    Senior Member Beerislife's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Tokyo
    Posts
    111
    Threads
    22
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    04:10 PM

    Automatically delete cached update packages

    Every time there's a software update I have to run Bleachbit as root to remove all the downloaded files left over from the install, sometimes this is nearly 10Gb of stuff taking up space on my / partition. I'm sure there used to be an option in update settings to automatically delete them after updating but for the life of me can't find it in Discover!

    Please refresh my failing memory ;D

  2. Back To Top    #2
    Kubuntu Padawan Don B. Cilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ibiza, Spain
    Posts
    1,150
    Threads
    57
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    09:10 AM
    See here.
    apt autoclean and the even more thorough apt clean are probably what you want..

  3. Back To Top    #3
    Senior Member Beerislife's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Tokyo
    Posts
    111
    Threads
    22
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    04:10 PM
    Yes, I use them, often, but I'd rather the system clean up after itself :)

    I think I may have found the answer in an older tutorial:

    https://is.gd/iRcf2g

    sudo nano etc/apt/apt.conf.d/10periodic

    and set APT::Periodic::AutocleanInterval to 1
    Last edited by Beerislife; Mar 8th 2020 at 07:21 AM.

  4. Back To Top    #4
    Kubuntu Padawan Don B. Cilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ibiza, Spain
    Posts
    1,150
    Threads
    57
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    09:10 AM
    Let us know if it works
    I don't sudo nano since Kate got clever, though ;·)

  5. Back To Top    #5
    Senior Member Beerislife's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Tokyo
    Posts
    111
    Threads
    22
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    04:10 PM
    I use sudo nano and sudo mc quite a lot, I'm old fashioned like that! :-)

  6. Back To Top    #6
    Ascendant oshunluvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Bern, NC USA
    Posts
    10,660
    Threads
    435
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    03:10 AM
    Hey, great tip!

    As for me, I use "sudo nano" so much I have an alias set to it. All I type is: sn
    Please Read Me
    Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside. - Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, 1711

  7. Back To Top    #7
    Kubuntu as a Second Language
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,891
    Threads
    68
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    07:10 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by oshunluvr View Post
    As for me, I use "sudo nano" so much I have an alias set to it. All I type is: sn
    This would be nearly functionally the same, except safer:
    Code:
    export SUDO_EDITOR=nano
    alias sn='sudoedit'
    Regards, John Little

  8. Back To Top    #8
    Ascendant oshunluvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Bern, NC USA
    Posts
    10,660
    Threads
    435
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    03:10 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by jlittle View Post
    This would be nearly functionally the same, except safer:
    Code:
    export SUDO_EDITOR=nano
    alias sn='sudoedit'
    And why is that safer on a machine in my home?
    Please Read Me
    Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside. - Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, 1711

  9. Back To Top    #9
    Kubuntu as a Second Language
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,891
    Threads
    68
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    07:10 PM
    I suggested sudoedit rather than sudo nano...
    Quote Originally Posted by oshunluvr View Post
    And why is that safer on a machine in my home?
    Two scenarios come to mind:
    1. ^O to write out the file. Nano gives a warning, but if you might be expecting it.
    2. Bugs in nano.

    But, for me, it's an attitude, to minimize running as root. This attitude can be important when things are going wrong, or when one is bored or tired. I've seen costly screw-ups by people with different attitudes.
    Regards, John Little

  10. Back To Top    #10
    Ascendant oshunluvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Bern, NC USA
    Posts
    10,660
    Threads
    435
    Local Date
    Jun 6th 2020
    Local Time
    03:10 AM
    So I clearly don't understand. Using nano as root is using nano as root, isn't it? What is the functional difference of launching "sudo nano" from setting nano as your sudo editor?
    Please Read Me
    Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside. - Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, 1711

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •